The entity relationship

The Entity Relationship Model - Learning MySQL [Book]

the entity relationship

An entity relationship model, also called an entity-relationship (ER) diagram, is a graphical representation of entities and their relationships to each other. An entity relationship diagram (ERD), also known as an entity relationship model, is a graphical representation of an information system that depicts the. The entity relationship (ER) data model has existed for over 35 years. It is well suited to data modelling for use with databases because it is fairly abstract and is .

Attributes can be empty; for example, some customers may not provide their telephone numbers. You should think carefully when classifying an attribute as multivalued: The sales database requirements may specify that a product has a name and a price.

To distinguish between products, we can assign a unique product ID number to each item we stock; this would be the primary key. Each product entity would have name, price, and product ID attributes. The ER diagram representation of the product entity Representing Relationships Entities can participate in relationships with other entities. For example, a customer can buy a product, a student can take a course, an artist can record an album, and so on.

the entity relationship

Like entities, relationships can have attributes: Our database could then record each sale and tell us, for example, that at 3: For example, each customer can buy any number of products, and each product can be bought by any number of customers. This is known as a many-to-many relationship. We can also have one-to-many relationships. For example, one person can have several credit cards, but each credit card belongs to just one person. Looking at it the other way, a one-to-many relationship becomes a many-to-one relationship; for example, many credit cards belong to a single person.

What is an Entity-Relationship Model (ER Model)? - Definition from Techopedia

Finally, the serial number on a car engine is an example of a one-to-one relationship; each engine has just one serial number, and each serial number belongs to just one engine.

We often use the shorthand terms 1: N for one-to-one, one-to-many, and many-to-many relationships, respectively. The number of entities on either side of a relationship the cardinality of the relationship define the key constraints of the relationship.

There are many relationships that may at first seem to be one-to-one, but turn out to be more complex.

For example, people sometimes change their names; in some applications, such as police databases, this is of particular interest, and so it may be necessary to model a many-to-many relationship between a person entity and a name entity. Redesigning a database can be time-consuming if you assume a relationship is simpler than it really is.

In an ER diagram, we represent a relationship set with a named diamond. The cardinality of the relationship is often indicated alongside the relationship diamond; this is the style we use in this book. The ER diagram representation of the customer and product entities, and the sale relationship between them.

Partial and Total Participation Relationships between entities can be optional or compulsory.

the entity relationship

In our example, we could decide that a person is considered to be a customer only if they have bought a product. On the other hand, we could say that a customer is a person whom we know about and whom we hope might buy something—that is, we can have people listed as customers in our database who never buy a product.

What is Entity Relationship Diagram (ERD)?

These are referred to as the participation constraints of the relationship. In an ER diagram, we indicate total participation with a double line between the entity box and the relationship diamond. From time to time, we encounter cases where we wonder whether an item should be an attribute or an entity on its own. For example, an email address could be modeled as an entity in its own right. When in doubt, consider these rules of thumb: Is the item of direct interest to the database?

Objects of direct interest should be entities, and information that describes them should be stored in attributes.

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  • When to draw ER Diagrams?
  • What is an ER diagram (ERD)?

Our inventory and sales database is really interested in customers, and not their email addresses, so the email address would be best modeled as an attribute of the customer entity. Does the item have components of its own? If so, we must find a way of representing these components; a separate entity might be the best solution.

In the student grades example at the start of the chapter, we stored the course name, year, and semester for each course that a student takes. Can the object have multiple instances? If so, we must find a way to store data on each instance. The cleanest way to do this is to represent the object as a separate entity.

In our sales example, we must ask whether customers are allowed to have more than one email address; if they are, we should model the email address as a separate entity. Is the object often nonexistent or unknown? If so, it is effectively an attribute of only some of the entities, and it would be better to model it as a separate entity rather than as an attribute that is often empty.

Consider a simple example: The ER diagram representation of student grades as a separate entity Entity or Relationship?

An easy way to decide whether an object should be an entity or a relationship is to map nouns in the requirements to entities, and to map the verbs to relations. Different shapes at the ends of these lines represent the relative cardinality of the relationship.

Crow's foot notation was used in the consultancy practice CACI. With this notation, relationships cannot have attributes. Where necessary, relationships are promoted to entities in their own right: Model usability issues[ edit ] You can help by adding to it. February In using a modeled database, users can encounter two well known issues where the returned results mean something other than the results assumed by the query author.

The first is the 'fan trap'. It occurs with a master table that links to multiple tables in a one-to-many relationship. The issue derives its name from the way the model looks when it's drawn in an entity—relationship diagram: This type of model looks similar to a star schemaa type of model used in data warehouses.

When trying to calculate sums over aggregates using standard SQL over the master table, unexpected and incorrect results. The solution is to either adjust the model or the SQL. This issue occurs mostly in databases for decision support systems, and software that queries such systems sometimes includes specific methods for handling this issue.

the entity relationship

The second issue is a 'chasm trap'. A chasm trap occurs when a model suggests the existence of a relationship between entity types, but the pathway does not exist between certain entity occurrences. For example, a Building has one-or-more Rooms, that hold zero-or-more Computers. One would expect to be able to query the model to see all the Computers in the Building. However, Computers not currently assigned to a Room because they are under repair or somewhere else are not shown on the list.

Entity–relationship model

Another relation between Building and Computers is needed to capture all the computers in the building. This last modelling issue is the result of a failure to capture all the relationships that exist in the real world in the model. See Entity-Relationship Modelling 2 for details. Entity—relationships and semantic modeling[ edit ] Semantic model[ edit ] A semantic model is a model of concepts, it is sometimes called a "platform independent model".

It is an intensional model.